Gogglebox 2

Image Jo Freitag

Image Jo Freitag

When I returned from the Hoagies’ Blog Hop: Gifted in Pop Culture
http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/blog_hop_pop_culture.htm
I found Sprite and co were still playing the Gogglebox game and were watching an episode of The Big Bang Theory where Sheldon invents a formula for making friends
This is something which Sprite often finds difficult
Little Bully Black Dog was literally rolling around the floor laughing.
“It is funny because it is true!” he gasped between bursts of laughter.
“That is exactly what Sprite is like all the time!”

“She is not like that ALL the time” said the pedantic Intellectual Dabrowski. “I will admit that she is SOMETIMES like that. But these TV programs show exaggerations of the characters because they are trying to condense it into 30 minutes. So they have to magnify the characters’ mannerisms so that the audience notices them.

“Well I think it is hilarious!” said Little Bully Black Dog “In half an hour I get enough material to tease Sprite for a whole month!”

“See, that is what I wasconcerned about!” said Edward the Autonomous Learner “When I said what messages are being given about giftedness and gifted people?
Are the depictions accurate?  Do they make viewers like and feel empathy with gifted people? What are the consequences if they do not? I was thinking about situations like this where people would use what they saw on TV as fuel for teasing or bullying”

“I think that is why I don’t like cartoons” said Sprite “Usually they are drawn with exaggerated features so they do not look realistic. That is why I don’t like the way Jo draws me
She even drew this picture of me for the topic Exaggerated for her Art Challenge.”

“I am sure that is a good illustration of how it felt” said Sensual Dabrowski.

Image Jo Freitag

Image Jo Freitag

“Yes it was. But I know it was not how I looked because I have the other picture for comparison” Sprite replied.
“I believe it also depends on perspective” said Intellectual “Things can look very different when viewed from a different angle.
And that is true of the TV audiences too. How they understand and interpret what they see will depend on their background and viewpoint.
And how people act toward gifted people after viewing will also differ.”

“What did you see on the other blogs on the Hoagiesgifted’ May blog hop?” asked Edward

asterisks

These are the posts I visited and the comments I left or tried to leave.

Giftedness in the media by Adventures of Hahn Academy
https://adventuresofhahnacademy.wordpress.com/2016/05/01/giftedness-in-the-media/ 

Sadly, the portrayal of gifted individuals in popular media is not always correct or positive. Rather, the media tends to reinforce stereotypes and send the message that the highly gifted are not normal. Gifted individuals or geniuses in pop culture have an unbelievably high IQ, exaggerated behavior or personality traits, elicit conversation, interests in obscure topics, rattle off statistics and calculations, play chess, read thick books, seem blunt and insensitive, some level of arrogance, emotionally detached, logical-minded, etc… The media’s insistence on reinforcing stereotypes is not helping how the gifted are perceived by others. Instead, people are sometimes describing gifted children based on which TV character they think the child is more like…

My comment: What an excellent compilation of sources and resources! Many of them are new to me and I will enjoy investigating them.

Picture books for gifted children by Caitlin Fitzpatrick Curley, My Little Poppies
http://my-little-poppies.com/picture-books-for-gifted-children/

I love it when I stumble upon a book that speaks to me. It is a wonderful feeling when you step into a book that feels like home. These books feel like old friends, safe and comfortable. As a bibliophile and homeschooling mom, I want my children to experience this phenomenon.
Gifted children are outliers. They think outside of that proverbial box. They are unique and all too often misunderstood.
There is a safety in books that can be life-altering in the early years. The right book can make you feel whole, understood, valued

My Comment: Great selection of books! Thank you, Cait.

Einstein, the Big Bang, and Scorpion by Linda Wallin, Living with Geniuses

Just because a person has a high IQ, they do not necessarily lack social graces. There can be some difficulties adjusting to others, as a friend told me twenty years ago. Her son’s IQ approached 190, and he would complete assignments that did not fulfill the teacher’s requirements. She would patiently explain to him why he should change it, and he would patiently explain to her why it had to be done his way…

My Comment: I think often the media exaggerate characteristics which can make their portrayals of gifted people seem less realistic.

Everything I needed to know about being a smart kid, I learned from 80’s movies by Jen, repurposed genealogy
3. Get a mentor to guide you
Maybe your mentor can artfully sculpt a bonsai tree and catch flies with chopsticks like Mr. Miyagi. Maybe he invented a time machine like Doc Brown. Your mentor needs have the intellect and ability to guide you through challenges….

My comment: Thanks for a really enjoyable revisiting of these movies!

G” in Popular Culture ~ or ~ How to Be a Gifted Elder by Joy Navan, ongiftedelders

Now I am an elder.  I thought when I retired, I was supposed to quilt, and travel occasionally. I thought I would be leaving everything else that defined me behind – wife, mother, professional. What a surprise! I am still gifted as an elder and must find my way in this strange new world. Thankfully, there are role models like my mentor, Annemarie Roeper, and others who teach us how to be a gifted elder…

My comment: I love the idea of being an autonomous life long learner – there is always so much more to learn! And I like your words of wisdom especially numbers 3 and 4

Profiling the Gifted in Popular Culture by Gift-Ed Connections

From Sheldon to Rachel, Matilda to Ender, we are enthralled with gifted characters. We are fascinated by the complexity of their thoughts, their unique and amazing abilities, their unusual reactions to situations, their character flaws and how they overcome difficulties. Do they serve us well as we seek to understand more and educate about giftedness? As with any caricature as characters often tend to be, storylines can highlight some qualities of the gifted experience but ultimately fail in capturing the unique qualities…

My comment: I enjoyed this post and the examples of gifted individuals you gave.

Using Pop Culture References to Explain Giftedness by Lisa on Raising Wizards

Sometimes it’s hard to explain what giftedness really is, and how it makes children feel. Luckily, a good example can really pave the way for a great discussion. Here, we’ve compiled all of our favorite posts that use pop culture references to describe elements of giftedness. Feel free to steal some ideas next time you need to explain giftedness to someone!

My comment: A really great collection of articles about depictions of giftedness in popular films and books.

Gilmore Girls and Two Faces of Giftedness by Institute for Educational Advancement

…re-watching a favorite episode, it hit me that one thing I have never seen addressed is the giftedness of two of the characters and the contrasts in how it is manifested.
Rory is a teenager who would be considered “gifted” by most traditional definitions of the word. She craves knowledge and grasps concepts easily. As her grandfather put it, “This girl could name the state capitals at 3, recite the periodic table at 4, (and) discuss Schopenhauer’s influence on Nietzsche when she was 10.” Rory clearly has an advanced ability….

My comment: It is interesting to see possible causes of underachievement being addressed in a popular TV series.

Gifted in Pop Culture: Role Models Required by Carolyn K., Hoagies’ Nibbles and Bits

One thing our kids want and need to watch and read are stories where they find others “like them.” Other gifted kids, passionate about real-world issues. Other gifted kids, with strong interests and sometimes stronger fears. Other gifted kids who work hard and play hard. Gifted kids, as all kids, need books and movies with role models who they can identify with. They need to know they are Not Alone

My comment: A great selection of books and plays – some of them new to me. Thank you, Carolyn!

It’s Been a While… by Chocky’s Child

Chocky was a science fiction novel by John Wyndham, and it was adapted into a TV series in the mid 1980s, when I was a child. I like the book and the original series, but two subsequent follow up series – Chocky’s Children and Chocky’s Challenge spoke to me more, because of the presence of one character in particular. Her name was Albertine – and she’d named after Albert Einstein. Albertine was only a kid – a girl of about 13, I think – and she was a genius.

My comment: Great to hear from you again Shaun! I loved Chocky and Welcome to the Ark. And you were the one who introduced me to Top kid and Ender’s game which I appreciated too.

Gifted Characters In Korean And Japanese Dramas by Elgarmummy

The Korean Wave, known as Hallyu, has been sweeping Asia and the rest of the world in terms of entertainment for years, and there is no sign of abating. With East Asian countries placing strong emphasis on academics and other areas such as music, it is no wonder that some of the lead characters in dramas are gifted

My comment: Wow, Sarah! All these characters were new to me and I found the post really interesting!

Giftedness Magnified by Ann Grahl, Supporting Gifted Learners

Think of the pop stars we’ve witnessed go from America’s darlings to targets for trolls and critics alike.
As a gifted young adult friend recently observed, “You think it is tough growing up gifted. Just imagine growing up gifted under a magnifying glass.”
Popular gifted performers of all stripes face challenges similar to those that less-well-known gifted young people face…

My comment: Great post Ann. It is hard enough dealing with the asynchrony and intensities of giftedness without doing it in the public spotlight!

Post script: Gogglebox was awarded a Logie in the category of Best Factual Program

This has been a review post for Hoagies’ May Blog Hop: Gifted in Pop Culture.
Read more by going on the hop at
www.HoagiesGifted.org/blog_hop_pop_culture.htm

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Gogglebox

gogglebox01a

“We are playing Gogglebox!” Sprite told me “Well, all except Psycho Motor Dabrowski – he’s bouncing.”

“Yes” agreed Psycho Motor “I was getting bored with playing Gogglebox and going Boing takes the AHR out of Boring. I will go back and watch when something exciting comes on.”

Gogglebox Australia is based on the U.K. program of the same name and is a weekly “reality” TV observational series which captures the reactions of “ordinary” Australians as they watch selected television programs. The chosen households are rigged with cameras to capture their reactions.

Sprite, the Dabrowski Dogs, Columbus Cheetah, the Persona Dolls, and Sprite’s soft toys were sitting in groups watching a television screen, a laptop or a cardboard box representing a TV.
“We all watch the same program and we talk about it – like a running commentary” Sprite said. “And I do the voice-over introductions.”

gogglebox04

Intellectual Dabrowski was conducting fact checks and then arguing loudly about any inconsistencies he found.
Sensual was appreciating the images and the background mood music and canned laughter in the shows and the taste of the snacks they were sharing while they watched.
Imaginational was imagining what it would be like to be the characters or to experience the situations they were viewing.
And Emotional Dabrowski was riding an emotional roller coaster – sad, happy, indignant, proud, happy, nostalgic, sad, confused….

Columbus Cheetah was checking the content for depictions of stereotypes of myths relating to giftedness.

“Tonight, in a special edition of Gogglebox, our families will be watching television programs which feature gifted characters” Sprite said in her announcer’s voice.

The first program was The Simpsons.

“I like Lisa” said Miranda, the Successful student “She is like me!”
“I think she is snooty” said Vincent, the At Risk student
“I like that Lisa has strong ethics and is concerned about the environment” said Imaginational.
“Are there any other gifted characters?” I asked.
“Bart might be” said Vincent
“And Maggie is very young but she does seem to be very clever, the dear little poppet” said Emotional.
“What about Marge?” I asked
“Ha!” said Sprite “You want me to say yes; because you think Marge is like you!”

“Do you think people who watch this show would like the gifted characters?
And do you think it gives an accurate picture of them?” I asked.

“Well you know what I think about cartoon characters!” Sprite snorted. I remembered that she had been cross with me when I created a Simpson character avatar for her
“They don’t even have the right number of fingers – so how accurate do you think it is?”

“This show does not reinforce any of the ten myths about giftedness that I endeavour to bust at http://www.giftedresources.org/gr/columbuscheetah.htm” said Columbus Cheetah. “And it does address a number of the social emotional issues that gifted people face so I score this show quite highly for depiction of gifted characters.”

“Do you think people would like the gifted characters?” I asked

Suddenly everyone was speaking at once.
“Yes”
“No”
“Maybe”
“If they felt empathy with them”
“Everyone here is gifted (except some of the soft toys) so what we say might not be what other people say”
“But we don’t even all agree so it is not a matter of whether the viewer is gifted or not”
The only group that remained silent was the soft toys.
“What do the soft toys think?” I asked
“They think what I tell them to think!” said Sprite.

gogglebox02

“Big Question Time!” said Edward, the Autonomous Learner “Are the people who write and produce these TV shows trying to tell us what to think? How many people watch TV critically and evaluate what they see? How many just sit in front of it and accept it all as true?
And, if so, what messages are being given to them about giftedness and gifted people?
Are the depictions accurate?  Do they make viewers like and feel empathy with gifted people?
What are the consequences if they do not?”

Dr. Wilma Vialle has written a paper titled Pink or Paris? Giftedness in popular culture about the depiction of giftedness in popular culture and how it impacts gifted girls in finding their role models. You can read it at http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2222&context=edupapers

As well as television another major influence on popular culture is films. Many films have featured gifted characters and Jo has developed a series of film discussions which can be found at http://www.giftedresources.org/gr/filmsrev15.htm

There are so many television series which feature gifted characters.
Some which come to mind are
Daria
Scorpion
The Big Bang Theory
Num3ers
Bones
Doogie Howser, MD
Star Trek: The next generation
Malcolm in the Middle
Sherlock
The Pretender
House
We would not be able to able to discuss them all in one Gogglebox sitting.

“Next our families will be viewing The Big Bang Theory” intoned Sprite in her voice-over announcer’s voice.

This is a post for Hoagies’ May Blog Hop: Gifted in Pop Culture.
Read more by going on the hop at www.HoagiesGifted.org/blog_hop_pop_culture.htm

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Bachelor of Bouncing, Doctor of Daydreaming

Image Jo Freitag

Image Jo Freitag

Columbus Cheetah and the Dabrowski Dogs were discussing the new school year and how they could help Sprite to succeed.

Columbus Cheetah had the Feetspeak Quest map  and Prof Francoys Gagne’s DMGT model diagram  spread out and was trying to plot a path for Sprite from innate giftedness to fully developed talent.
“We can provide her with support and make opportunities available” Columbus was saying “But there are still speed humps and difficulties to overcome.
Being 2E does complicate matters.
It is quite a challenge to prevent her from being an underachiever.
She finds it hard to demonstrate her giftedness and many of her areas of strength are not ones that are recognized and rewarded in the school system.
She does not receive any credit from the school for the astronomy evenings with her mentor.
And the school is not impressed with her very original way of thinking such as:
https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2014/04/14/thats-what-its-all-about/
https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/07/30/critical-thinking/
https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2015/11/24/timelines/

It is a myth that all gifted students will be successful in school.” Columbus concluded.

“If Sprite is going to succeed academically I should be the only one to accompany her to school” stated Intellectual Dabrowski.

There were growls and howls of disagreement from all the other Dabrowski Dogs.

“I am the only one who has a remote chance of getting her through the system and ending up with some sort of official academic qualification” Intellectual continued.
“What will you others help her achieve?
Bachelor of Bouncing with Psycho Motor Dabrowski
Honorary degree in Histrionics with Emotional Dabrowski
Certificate of Completion in Corporeal Comforts with Sensual Dabrowski
Or Doctorate in Daydreaming with Imaginational Dabrowski”

“What I am trying to say” said Columbus Cheetah “is that, as well as advocating for provisions for Sprite at school, it will be necessary for her to be given plenty of opportunities and experiences outside the school setting and that time with her mentor, Paula the Physicist will be very valuable.”

This is a post for Hoagies’ Gifted February 2016 blog hop:
Other Achievement: when your child doesn’t achieve where you hope. 
To find out what advice other bloggers have come on the hop with us starting at www.HoagiesGifted.org/blog_hop_other_achievement.htm

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Discovering the depth and breadth of giftedness

Image Jo Freitag

Image Jo Freitag

The sign announcing the Gifted Homeschoolers Forum October blog hop: Discovering the depth and breadth of giftedness appeared at Sprite’s Site at much the same time as the Lobsters arrived for their Annual Lobby Lobsterfest with the Lolly Lobbing competition and dancing of the Lobster Quadrille.

The suggestions for the topics which could be discussed read

This hop is about exploring the breadth and depth of giftedness – in general, in your kids, or in whatever you want to explore. Perhaps it’s also an opportunity to discuss what the public doesn’t understand – how giftedness looks like a lot of things because it IS a lot of things, not just a kid sitting in the front row of the classroom getting easy As. Perhaps less simplification of giftedness would help others to understand nuances and complexity – why we keep going on about it, and why a one size fits all GATE program doesn’t work for all gifted kids (nor even identify them all).

“Depth and breadth suggests the necessity to measure” declared the Lobsters.
The Forensic Lobsters had brought all the tools necessary to gauge the possible presence of the Wicked Lemon Wedges
They produced rulers to measure the extent of the giftedness and a protractor to measure the degree of the giftedness.
With the help of One Twitter Bird on a ladder they measured Sprite while she was standing. Even though Sprite was not standing up straight the ruler was not long enough to give an accurate measure.

measuring03a

Image Jo Freitag

So then they measured her in a seated position and checked the number of degrees of the angle of elevation of her leg and added the total (in degrees) to the height total (in centimetres) to compensate for Sprite being a 2E student and came up with an IQ of …….

“What on earth dooo yooou think yooou are doooing?” hooted the Psych-Owl- Ogist.

“To identify giftedness and derive an accurate score for IQ it is necessary for a qualified psychologist or education consultant (preferably with an interest and expertise in giftedness) to administer appropriate testing. The tests must have a sufficiently high ceiling level to be accurate at the upper level; otherwise you will only be able to say that the IQ is above a certain level. I have heard it likened to measuring all the members of the Harlem Globe Trotters basketball team with a six foot ruler and then saying they are all more than six feet tall.
And there are also other ways of identifying giftedness by observation and check lists.

But, as I told Retweet Gifted is not a homogenous group!
There are varying levels of giftedness and varying domains of expertise combined with varying character profiles and personality types.
I discuss some of the aspects of giftedness here https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/05/07/the-psych-owl-ogist-2/

And I talk about social/emotional issues here https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/05/17/the-psych-owl-ogist-4/

Fortunately Gifted Homeschoolers Forum has an excellent collection of articles about these topics at http://giftedhomeschoolers.org/resources/parent-and-professional-resources/articles/
Defining giftedness at http://giftedhomeschoolers.org/resources/parent-and-professional-resources/articles/defining-giftedness/
Tests and testing http://giftedhomeschoolers.org/resources/parent-and-professional-resources/articles/testing-2/

“The other problem” chimed in Columbus Cheetah “is that very often people have mistaken ideas about what giftedness is and is not. There are so many myths surrounding giftedness. I always aim to counter the myths in my role as Myth Buster
http://www.giftedresources.org/gr/columbuscheetah.htm
And I also advocate for employing acceleration when appropriate and using the Iowa acceleration scales
https://www.accelerationinstitute.org/Resources/IAS.aspx

One of the common misconceptions is that all children are gifted
Gifted Homeschoolers Forum has a page of Rapid Responses to this issue at http://giftedhomeschoolers.org/resources/parent-and-professional-resources/articles/are-all-children-gifted/

Thank goodness Gifted Homeschoolers Forum gives links to information about giftedness and its measurement so that we do not have to do not have to rely on Lobsters with rulers and protractors.

This is a post for Gifted Homeschoolers Forum October blog hop.
To find all the posts please go to

http://giftedhomeschoolers.org/blog-hops/discovering-the-depth-and-breadth-of-giftedness/

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Beginning the journey: Gifted 101

Image Jo Freitag

Image Jo Freitag

Hoagies’ Gifted Blog Hop for August 2015 has the theme Gifted 101
‘For back to school, let’s share all we’ve learned with those who are just beginning the journey. Whether it’s your favorite resources, advocacy advice, parenting, schooling, homeschooling, acceleration… There are so many things we have to share!’

The stories about The Tweet family of Twitter Birds who live on Sprite’s Site Blog illustrate the beginnings of the gifted journey.

In February 2012 Retweet laid a blue egg and a pink egg and in March 2012 the tweetlets, Tweetil and Tweetelle, hatched.

By late March the tweetlets were demonstrating characteristics often
associated with giftedness in early childhood and their stories described parenting
issues and differences of opinion with Great Aunt Hashtag
 https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/03/22/tweetlets/
https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/03/24/in-my-day/
https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/03/26/the-tweetlets-meet-the-dabrowski-dogs/
https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/04/15/nappies-on-tweetlets/

Then came a series of tales about asynchronous development as the Tweet family commenced Flight School
https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/04/20/flight-school/
 https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/04/21/flight-school-with-help-from-the-dabrowski-dogs/
 https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/04/22/flight-school-hits-the-asynchrony-speed-bump/
https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/04/24/marking-time-to-the-beat-of-their-own-drum/
https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/04/24/in-my-day-reprise/
https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/05/02/tweetelle-becomes-a-seedetarian/

Image Jo Freitag

Image Jo Freitag

The Psych-Owl-Ogist was consulted and we learned about characteristics of giftedness and social/emotional aspects
https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/05/03/the-psych-owl-ogist-1/
https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/05/07/the-psych-owl-ogist-2/
https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/05/14/the-psych-owl-ogist-3/
https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/05/17/the-psych-owl-ogist-4/
https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/05/24/the-psych-owl-ogist-5/
https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/05/28/the-psych-owl-ogist-6/

Next came the discussions involved in finding the right flock for the tweetlets
https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/07/17/finding-the-right-flock/
https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/07/27/finding-the-right-flock-2/
https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/08/18/finding-the-right-flock-3/
and the decision to continue with Nest Ed and the challenges associated with that choice
 https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2013/03/11/socialization/
https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2013/03/14/socialization-2/
https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2013/03/16/qualified-to-teach/
https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/10/07/cuckoos-in-the-nest/
https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2013/02/22/when-extended-family-dont-get-giftedness/

Image Jo Freitag

Image Jo Freitag

I hope that sharing these stories about the experiences of the Tweet family will be helpful.

To read more about the topic of Gifted 101 join the Hoagies’ Blog hop at http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/blog_hop_gifted_101.htm

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Gifted relationships

Image Jo Freitag

Image Jo Freitag

Retweet the Twitter Bird was back from the Hoagiesgifted’ July blog hop feeling very encouraged and bubbling over with ideas for future projects for her tweetlets.

She had been encouraged by Paula Prober’s post   If I’m so smart, why am I so lonely? at Your rainforest mind that there were other like minds to be found

And she had found tips about where to find like minds at Cait’s My little poppies post Finding and forging gifted relationships

She heard about the effort required maintain relationships at Adventures of Hahn Academy’s post Relationships require work /

And she had seen the value of relationships in Celi’s Crushing tall poppies post
Gifted relationships The silver lining in the gifted storm

She had found these helpful tips about building healthy friendships at Up Parenting Creek
7 Tips to help your kids build healthy friendships
Build Negotiation Skills
Foster Empathy
Teach How to Say, “I’m Sorry” (and Mean It!)
Role Play Through Tricky Situations
Encourage Hobbies (Find a Tribe)
Make Your Home Welcoming
Model Healthy Friendships

She had decided that she would incorporate these tips into their NEST Ed and also would investigate the Virtues program mentioned in GiftEd connections post
Gifted and Struggling with Relationships? The Virtues are a Good Place to Start

But it was the post from Braver than you believe which really made Retweet think!
Five relationships every gifted kid needs
http://www.braverthanyoubelieve.com/2015/07/01/leaving-on-a-jet-plain-um-plane-2/

She agreed that it is important to have people in our lives who have the relationship of role model, mentor, peer, apprentice and sergeant.

Her tweetlets had found true peers of all ages at the Bower Holiday Programs and the Psych-Owl-Ogist had arranged a mentor for them. She was not sure whether they had anyone filling the other roles.

socialize02

She asked Sprite whether she had people who fitted those descriptions.

“My mentor Paula the Physicist is also my role model” Sprite told her “She has overcome the same problems I have and has earned tertiary degrees. And she loves astronomy like I do so we always have plenty to discuss”

Image Jo Freitag

Image Jo Freitag

“The role of Sergeant is being filled by Intellectual Dabrowski and P’est Pour Parfait, the Perfectionist Poodle. I don’t need anyone else telling me what to do and how to do it!”

“I guess I do have an Apprentice” Sprite continued. “There is a little kid in a lower class who follows me round and copies what I do. Like when I got my new pinafore she wore a pinafore just like it two days later.
I do not know what her name is. I call her Pincher because she always wants to have a go on my crutches and if I sit down to eat lunch she will try to borrow them. Sometimes I let her use them and one time I took a photo of her. Then I noticed she has a bandage on her ankle so maybe she is like me and I should try to help her like Paula helps me.”

“There was a post on the hop about gifted/special needs relationships” Retweet said.
The Fissure – The Power of Special Connections: Gifted/Special Needs Friendships

Image Jo Freitag

Image Jo Freitag

“What about peers? Do you have any special friends?” asked Retweet
“Can I count Paula and Columbus Cheetah and the Memory Elephant and the Dabrowski Dogs?” asked Sprite.

This is a follow up post to the Hoagiesgifted’ July blog hop http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/blog_hop_gifted_relationships.htm 

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Friends and relations

Image Jo Freitag

Image Jo Freitag

Great Aunt Hashtag was visiting the Tweet family again.

Retweet was trying to make the visit a positive experience by declaring that as part of their NEST Ed activities for the week they would be researching their family tree as Great Aunt Hashtag was very knowledgeable about Tweet’s family history.
“I am glad to see you are doing that.” said Great Aunt Hashtag.
“In MY day we knew how to respect our ancestors and relatives!”

Retweet already knew that there were several illustrious ancestors who were Leaders of the Great Migrations in Tweet’s family tree. She attributed the giftedness of her tweetlets to the genes they had inherited from Tweet’s family. However she acknowledged that there were many brilliant musicians, poets and visionaries on her side of the family tree.
And of course she had discussed the nature versus nurture issue with the Psych-Owl-Ogist on several occasions. He had shown her a diagram of Professor Francoys Gagne’s DMGT model and pointed to the Environmental Catalysts section to demonstrate how the influence of the nest environment played its part in the development of the Tweetlets innate giftedness into fully developed talent.
https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/05/07/the-psych-owl-ogist-2/

Tweet had also told Retweet about an old uncle who was a brilliant thinker and was said to be rather peculiar. Retweet was really keen to know more about him.

“Oh he was a bad egg, a bad egg!” said Great Aunt Hashtag “He was the black sheep of the family!”

Tweetelle tugged at Retweet’s wingtip “You told us sheep and dogs do not come out of eggs” she whispered
“The black sheep of the family is just a saying. We will talk about it later.” Retweet whispered back.

“It is a good thing you can choose your friends because you cannot choose your relations” Retweet said.
She was trying to smooth the conversation but she was also remembering some of the awkward moments when Great Aunt Hashtag had caused upset to the tweetlets during her visits.
Relationships can become quite strained when the characteristics of giftedness are not understood.
https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2013/02/22/when-extended-family-dont-get-giftedness/

“Talking about friends – do you still keep in touch with Trending and her family?” asked Great Aunt Hashtag.
“No. Trending and I have grown apart over the years and her tweetlets did not have any interests in common with my tweetlets.” Retweet replied.

https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2013/03/11/socialization/

https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2013/03/14/socialization-2/

Retweet had found that her tweetlets preferred the company of older tweetlets or adult Twitter birds. Finding same age friends had proved quite a challenge. She was glad that the tweetlets had found some like minded peers of all ages at the Bower Holiday Program.

“Is the Peculiar Bad Egg Bird my Uncle?” asked Tweetil.

“Let’s work it out” said Great Aunt Hashtag “If I am your great aunt and he was my third cousin once removed what relationship is he to you?

“I thought ‘In a Relationship’ was a polite way of saying the naughty word” said Tweetelle. “The baby sitter said she was In a Relationship and….”

Retweet went very pink in the face. “I think we may have to revisit the Birds and the Bees talk later” she said.

This is a post for Hoagiesgifted’ July Blog Hop: Gifted Relationships
To read more posts on the hop please visit
http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/blog_hop_gifted_relationships.htm 

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