Gifted 2E Kids: What Makes Them Twice-Exceptional? Blog hop

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I have been visiting the posts on the Gifted Homeschoolers Forum April blog hop ‘Gifted 2E kids: What makes them Twice Exceptional?
Sprite did not come with me as she was conducting guided tours to some of the places on Sprite’s Site but she was thrilled with the goodie bag I brought back for her.
Some kind person had also given her a blue teddy bear and balloon in recognition of April Autism Awareness Month 

These are the posts I visited on the blog hop and the comments I left or tried to leave
Gifted Homeschoolers Forum April blog hop ‘Gifted 2E kids: What makes them Twice Exceptional?
Being gifted can be its own challenge, but many gifted kids face additional hurdles which can mask or hamper their potential. Join these twice-exceptional kids and their families as they learn that the challenges that they face are what will help them soar.

Blessed by our Twice Exceptional Homeschooled Kid ~ BJ’s Homeschool (Betsy Sproger)

Our daughter has been a blessing to us, ever since we flew to China to adopt her, as an infant.  We decided to homeschool when she was 4, as she was ready for kindergarten, but her public school wasn’t.  She was considered too young.
My comment: Thank you for a wonderful post, Betsy! It really illustrates the advantages homeschooling can give our 2E kids!.

Gifted 2e: A Brilliant Mess ~ Hifalutin’ Homeschooler (Jennifer Smith Cabrera)

I don’t believe in ADHD, but I am pretty sure two of my kids have it, and we could add a few sensory hashtags. Recently, I learned the term twice exceptional or 2e. I like the all-encompassing value of the term, but still I hesitate. My son is a whole mess of personality quirks, brilliant and unique. Brilliance that could be missed, if it were prefaced with a cloud of labels buzzing around him like flies. I believe that the unique behavior of gifted children is just the exhaust of beautiful minds at work.
My comment: A very enjoyable post! Thank you.

Gifted and 2e: An Exceptionally Different Road ~ Gluten-Free Mum (Kathleen Humble)

It can be easy to think of exceptions as things that need to be fixed, to treat difference as something that needs to be shoved back into the box (even while we laud the idea of individuality). But living with my fantastic twice exceptional little tribe has taught me a very valuable lesson: there is no path. There is no right way to do anything, and the exception can be just as beautiful and amazing as the more familiar way.
My comment: I love this: I have, perforce discovered that there is no right way to anything, particularly in regards to children’s development – there is only the statistical average. There is no set developmental timeline, and these quirky kids will do things in their own time and their own way.

Gifted 2E Kids: The Most Underrepresented ~A 2e Fox Revived (Carolyn Fox)

Gifted 2e Kids are the most underrepresented and that’s why so many of us seek homeschooling as an alternative option for our kids. It’s based on my chance to blow off steam after reading NPR’s article on Gifted, But Still Learning English – not that I don’t think non-native English speakers aren’t underrepresented (because I think they are) but because the article says nothing about 2e kids and who probably represent a much larger piece of the portion of students underrepresented in gifted programs.
My comment: A great post, Carolyn. I love your descriptions of the simultaneous contradictions that can be found in 2E students.

How Distance Running Prepared Me for Parenting a Twice Exceptional Child ~ The Fissure (Nikki C.}

When you are raising a twice-exceptional child, hearing the word “can’t” comes with the territory.  You might be trying to help your child through another public meltdown, or trying to persuade the school into testing your child for the gifted program even though he has a disability…Removing the word “can’t” encourages perseverance, enhances endurance, and boosts confidence.  These things help when you need to take the road less traveled.
My comment: I love this analogy to long distance running, Nikki! I especially like “each runner needs to find his or her own best shoe” Very often for 2E, as my Sprite attests, this means a different best shoe for each foot!

If He’s REALLY So Smart… When Gifted Kids Struggle (Colleen Kessler)

“Boy is he an EXTREME thinker! If he actually took the time to sit and focus on his work, he could accomplish anything…” As helpful and positive as his preschool teacher thought she was being, words like this can set some of our most intelligent kiddos up for a lifetime of failure. So, why do some gifted children struggle so much? If they’re really as smart as we say they are, why can’t some of them just do their work?
My comment:  “if he’s so smart, why can’t he..?” This was always one of my least favourite comments too!

Misconceptions About Gifted & Twice-Exceptional Children ~Gifted Homeschooling (Amy Harrington)

Gifted is a fairly loaded term in mainstream society. The word doesn’t conjure up different neural wiring like autism or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder does. All of these brain based differences elicit various reactions from those who are unfamiliar with neurodiversity. If people understood what giftedness means and what twice-exceptional is, they would have a better appreciation and, perhaps, compassion for the whole spectrum of this type of divergent thinking and its impact on daily life.
My comment: I agree strongly with your comment ” If people understood what giftedness means and what twice-exceptional is, they would have a better appreciation and, perhaps, compassion for the whole spectrum of this type of divergent thinking and its impact on daily life.”

The Problem With Being Twice-Exceptional and British ~ Laugh, Love, Learn (Lucinda Leo)

Giftedness is misunderstood in many countries, but in Britain the very word is taboo. This is one mother’s story of how she had to get past cultural prejudice to find support for her twice-exceptional son.
My comment: Thank you for a very interesting post, Lucinda and also for the links to the valuable resources.

What Makes 2e? ~ Homeschooling Hatters (Care Martin)
Honestly, one of the best parts of having a twice-exceptional child is that everything is shiny and new – every day is different from the last, and while we do have our challenges, it actually makes life so much more interesting.
My comment: Yes I love “Double the cool” as well!
And you are right – problems usually arise from unrealistic expectations.

What Twice-Exceptional Looks Like in Our World (and 5 Things that Help) ~ My Little Poppies (Caitlin Curley)

They say if you’ve met one 2E kid, you’ve met one 2E kid. Today, I’m sharing with twice-exceptional looks like in our world.
My comment: I remember those night time worries so well! Thank you for a great post and so many useful links to resources!

This has been a review post for Gifted Homeschoolers Forum April blog hop ‘Gifted 2E kids: What makes them Twice Exceptional?

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What makes them 2E?

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In conjunction with the Gifted Homeschoolers Forum April blog hop theme ‘Gifted 2E kids: What makes them Twice Exceptional?’ Sprite is conducting guided tours to some of the places in Sprite’s Site.

Image Jo Freitag

Image Jo Freitag

The first stop on the tour is the Analogy for 2E exhibit where visitors are treated to a demonstration of Roman Riding a cheetah and a tortoise.

Sprite explains that in a horse riding class where the aim of the lessons is to be able to ride independently seated on the back of a horse

  • some students will not have the ability or confidence to sit on the horse without being led by someone else
  • average students will be able to sit on the horse and ride independently
  • bright students may perform Roman riding of two horses – standing with a foot on each horse’s back
  • gifted students will perform Roman riding on two cheetahs
  • and 2E twice exceptional students will be forced to perform their Roman riding with one foot on the back of a cheetah and the other on the back of a tortoise.

At the Myths exhibit Columbus Cheetah explains that one of the myths surrounding giftedness is that it is not possible to be gifted and have a disability
https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2014/01/17/columbus-cheetah-myth-buster-myth-8/

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Visitors are then taken to the theatrette to view presentations about 2E students

The first is titled ‘2E is’ and is found at https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2015/05/01/2e-is/

The second presentation is a discussion of the Characteristics of 2 E students using a chart provided by the Cherry Creek Schools which can be found at
http://www.cherrycreekschools.org/StudentAchievement/Documents/2EDistinguishingCharacteristics.pdf

Those who have time to take the extended tour can listen to webinars about 2E students at

Jo Freitag: Characteristics of 2e students part 1
https://johart1.edublogs.org/2012/11/28/edublogs-webinar-overview-characteristics-of-2e-students-part-1/

Jo Freitag: Characteristics of 2e students part 2
https://johart1.edublogs.org/2012/12/17/edublogs-webinar-overview-characteristics-of-2e-students-part-2/

Personas, profiles and portraits of giftedness Part 2
https://jofreitag.wordpress.com/2015/06/07/australia-e-series-tech-talk-tuesdays-webinar-part-2/

For those who do not have time to listen to the webinars Sprite has prepared a short slide show which illustrates just a few of the characteristics of 2E students observed by Dr Linda Silverman.

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For more information about twice exceptional students see
2E newsletter
http://www.2enewsletter.com/

Hoagies Gifted Twice Exceptional resources page
http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/2e_exceptional.htm

Gifted Homeschoolers Forum Twice Exceptional resources page
http://giftedhomeschoolers.org/resources/twice-exceptional/

To read all the posts about this topic in the blog hop please visit the Gifted Homeschoolers Forum April blog hop at http://giftedhomeschoolers.org/blog-hops/gifted-2e-kids-what-makes-them-twice-exceptional/

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Bachelor of Bouncing, Doctor of Daydreaming

Image Jo Freitag

Image Jo Freitag

Columbus Cheetah and the Dabrowski Dogs were discussing the new school year and how they could help Sprite to succeed.

Columbus Cheetah had the Feetspeak Quest map  and Prof Francoys Gagne’s DMGT model diagram  spread out and was trying to plot a path for Sprite from innate giftedness to fully developed talent.
“We can provide her with support and make opportunities available” Columbus was saying “But there are still speed humps and difficulties to overcome.
Being 2E does complicate matters.
It is quite a challenge to prevent her from being an underachiever.
She finds it hard to demonstrate her giftedness and many of her areas of strength are not ones that are recognized and rewarded in the school system.
She does not receive any credit from the school for the astronomy evenings with her mentor.
And the school is not impressed with her very original way of thinking such as:
https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2014/04/14/thats-what-its-all-about/
https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/07/30/critical-thinking/
https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2015/11/24/timelines/

It is a myth that all gifted students will be successful in school.” Columbus concluded.

“If Sprite is going to succeed academically I should be the only one to accompany her to school” stated Intellectual Dabrowski.

There were growls and howls of disagreement from all the other Dabrowski Dogs.

“I am the only one who has a remote chance of getting her through the system and ending up with some sort of official academic qualification” Intellectual continued.
“What will you others help her achieve?
Bachelor of Bouncing with Psycho Motor Dabrowski
Honorary degree in Histrionics with Emotional Dabrowski
Certificate of Completion in Corporeal Comforts with Sensual Dabrowski
Or Doctorate in Daydreaming with Imaginational Dabrowski”

“What I am trying to say” said Columbus Cheetah “is that, as well as advocating for provisions for Sprite at school, it will be necessary for her to be given plenty of opportunities and experiences outside the school setting and that time with her mentor, Paula the Physicist will be very valuable.”

This is a post for Hoagies’ Gifted February 2016 blog hop:
Other Achievement: when your child doesn’t achieve where you hope. 
To find out what advice other bloggers have come on the hop with us starting at www.HoagiesGifted.org/blog_hop_other_achievement.htm

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Flocks and Shoes

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Image Jo Freitag

The Gifted Homeschoolers Forum January 2016 blog hop has the theme ‘Educating gifted children: The many ways we approach their learning’

In about two weeks Victorian students will begin the 2016 school year.
Choosing a school is always a big decision; but it is even more complex when choosing an education method for gifted children.
Considerations include:
*type of education- public school, private school, religion based school, alternative philosophies, Montessori style, Reggio Emilia, homeschooling
*ease of travel to school
*what specific provisions are made for gifted students? Is early entry / acceleration an option? What enrichment opportunities do they offer? Are the provisions offered full time or a once a week extra?

A list from the Davidson Institute of suggested questions to ask prospective schools can be found at http://www.davidsongifted.org/db/Articles_id_10403.aspx

Information about acceleration can be found at Acceleration Institute http://www.accelerationinstitute.org/

For the folk at Sprite’s Site the search for an ideal education can be expressed as Flocks and Shoes

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Image Jo Freitag

The Tweet Family

The Tweet family worked through these questions with the help of the Psych-Owl-Ogist in 2012
https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/07/17/finding-the-right-flock/
https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/07/27/finding-the-right-flock-2/
https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/08/18/finding-the-right-flock-3/
They eventually decided to continue their NEST Ed (Nest Education System of Training) program despite the challenges associated with that choice
https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2013/03/11/socialization/
https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2013/03/14/socialization-2/
https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2013/03/16/qualified-to-teach/

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Image Jo Freitag

Sprite
We have been on a quest with the help of Dr Ed Needs the (fictional) Education Consultant to find the ideal education for 2E Twice exceptional student Sprite within the school system, supplemented by extra activities and holiday programs.
We also found Paula, the Physicist to be a mentor for her.

We are using De Bono’s 6 Action shoes as the tool for planning and we road test them on Gagne’s DMGT (Differentiation Model of Giftedness and Talent) road from innate giftedness to fully developed talent.
This has been our experience with the various types of education represented by the shoes
Orange gumboots https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/09/15/orange-gumboots/

Pink slippers https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/09/19/pink-slippers/

Grey sneakers https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/09/28/grey-sneakers/

Blue formal shoes https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/10/02/blue-formal-shoes/

Purple riding boots https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/10/04/purple-riding-boots/

Brown brogues https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/10/07/brown-brogues/

More shoes https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/10/12/more-shoes/

One size shoe cover system https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2014/02/11/de-bonos-6-action-shoes-9-one-size-shoe-cover-system/

Plaster cast https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2011/02/12/casting-sprites-education-in-a-new-form-part-1/

It is also sometimes necessary to employ the strategies of S.C.A.M.P.E.R. in order to modify teaching methods for Sprite.

Every year we hope that the provisions which have been recommended and adopted in the previous year will continue but in the past we have often found that situations change and the measures had to be re-evaluated.

So until this year’s provisions for Sprite are settled she is wearing one orange gumboot representing stop gap measures to cater for her giftedness and a walker boot representing stop gap measures to cater for her difficulties.

This is a post for the Gifted Homeschoolers Forum January 2016 blog hop
Educating gifted children: The many ways we approach their learning
To read more posts please visit http://giftedhomeschoolers.org/blog-hops/educating-gifted-children-the-many-ways-we-approach-their-learning/ 

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Image Tara Hernandez

Discovering the depth and breadth of giftedness

Image Jo Freitag

Image Jo Freitag

The sign announcing the Gifted Homeschoolers Forum October blog hop: Discovering the depth and breadth of giftedness appeared at Sprite’s Site at much the same time as the Lobsters arrived for their Annual Lobby Lobsterfest with the Lolly Lobbing competition and dancing of the Lobster Quadrille.

The suggestions for the topics which could be discussed read

This hop is about exploring the breadth and depth of giftedness – in general, in your kids, or in whatever you want to explore. Perhaps it’s also an opportunity to discuss what the public doesn’t understand – how giftedness looks like a lot of things because it IS a lot of things, not just a kid sitting in the front row of the classroom getting easy As. Perhaps less simplification of giftedness would help others to understand nuances and complexity – why we keep going on about it, and why a one size fits all GATE program doesn’t work for all gifted kids (nor even identify them all).

“Depth and breadth suggests the necessity to measure” declared the Lobsters.
The Forensic Lobsters had brought all the tools necessary to gauge the possible presence of the Wicked Lemon Wedges
They produced rulers to measure the extent of the giftedness and a protractor to measure the degree of the giftedness.
With the help of One Twitter Bird on a ladder they measured Sprite while she was standing. Even though Sprite was not standing up straight the ruler was not long enough to give an accurate measure.

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Image Jo Freitag

So then they measured her in a seated position and checked the number of degrees of the angle of elevation of her leg and added the total (in degrees) to the height total (in centimetres) to compensate for Sprite being a 2E student and came up with an IQ of …….

“What on earth dooo yooou think yooou are doooing?” hooted the Psych-Owl- Ogist.

“To identify giftedness and derive an accurate score for IQ it is necessary for a qualified psychologist or education consultant (preferably with an interest and expertise in giftedness) to administer appropriate testing. The tests must have a sufficiently high ceiling level to be accurate at the upper level; otherwise you will only be able to say that the IQ is above a certain level. I have heard it likened to measuring all the members of the Harlem Globe Trotters basketball team with a six foot ruler and then saying they are all more than six feet tall.
And there are also other ways of identifying giftedness by observation and check lists.

But, as I told Retweet Gifted is not a homogenous group!
There are varying levels of giftedness and varying domains of expertise combined with varying character profiles and personality types.
I discuss some of the aspects of giftedness here https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/05/07/the-psych-owl-ogist-2/

And I talk about social/emotional issues here https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/05/17/the-psych-owl-ogist-4/

Fortunately Gifted Homeschoolers Forum has an excellent collection of articles about these topics at http://giftedhomeschoolers.org/resources/parent-and-professional-resources/articles/
Defining giftedness at http://giftedhomeschoolers.org/resources/parent-and-professional-resources/articles/defining-giftedness/
Tests and testing http://giftedhomeschoolers.org/resources/parent-and-professional-resources/articles/testing-2/

“The other problem” chimed in Columbus Cheetah “is that very often people have mistaken ideas about what giftedness is and is not. There are so many myths surrounding giftedness. I always aim to counter the myths in my role as Myth Buster
http://www.giftedresources.org/gr/columbuscheetah.htm
And I also advocate for employing acceleration when appropriate and using the Iowa acceleration scales
https://www.accelerationinstitute.org/Resources/IAS.aspx

One of the common misconceptions is that all children are gifted
Gifted Homeschoolers Forum has a page of Rapid Responses to this issue at http://giftedhomeschoolers.org/resources/parent-and-professional-resources/articles/are-all-children-gifted/

Thank goodness Gifted Homeschoolers Forum gives links to information about giftedness and its measurement so that we do not have to do not have to rely on Lobsters with rulers and protractors.

This is a post for Gifted Homeschoolers Forum October blog hop.
To find all the posts please go to

http://giftedhomeschoolers.org/blog-hops/discovering-the-depth-and-breadth-of-giftedness/

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Asking for Help – A Guest Expert Panel Q&A session

Image Jo Freitag

Image Jo Freitag

The Hoagies’ Gifted Blog Hop for October 2015 looks at How and When to Ask For Help
www.HoagiesGifted.org/blog_hop_asking_for_help.htm

Who can help gifted and 2E students and how and when should we seek help?
From school administrators, teachers and coaches, mentors and leaders? From counsellors or therapists? From state &/or federal government? From humankind? From the Universe? From family and friends and other members of the gifted community? Who helps or has helped you and how? How did you seek them or reach them or find them? What difference did it make?

To address these questions we have assembled a panel of experts from Sprite’s Site.
Paula, the Physicist, will answer questions about the role of a mentor.
Dr. Ed Needs, the Education Consultant, will be joining the session via Skype.
Columbus Cheetah will speak about the myths surrounding gifted and 2E students.
The Psych-Owl-Ogist will address issues relating to identification and testing and social/emotional issues.
Twitter Bird Retweet, mother of gifted tweetlets, will speak about the support available from Parent Support Groups.
A representative from the government was invited but sent a note of apology and referred the audience to their website.
Intellectual Dabrowski was not one of the invited experts but offered to share his extensive knowledge.

The format will be Question and Answer to preselected questions.
At the end of the session the audience will have an opportunity to ask their questions in the Comments section at the end of this post.

Question 1: How can you identify gifted students and where can you go for testing?
Psych-Owl-Ogist: There are checklists which can be completed by teachers and parents and various other ways of recording observations which can help to identify gifted students.
However if you need an I.Q. test administered you need to find a psychologist or education consultant who is qualified and registered to administer the test. And it is important to choose a person who specialises in working with gifted people.
The main tests are the Stanford Binet and the WISC. For articles and discussions about the comparisons between these and other tests see http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/identification.htm 
http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/testing.htm

Dr Ed Needs: Some education consultants are also qualified and registered to administer these tests as well as academic achievement level testing. They can also give testing to show areas of strength/weakness and detect possible learning difficulties and give the necessary recommendations, therapy and support.

Intellectual Dabrowski: If you are looking for psychologists and education consultants in Australia who have a special interest in giftedness see Gifted Resources list at http://www.giftedresources.org/gr/psychedcons.htm

Question 2 (To Retweet): Where have you found helpful advice for raising your gifted tweetlets?

Retweet: The Psych-Owl-Ogist tested the tweetlets and gave us helpful advice about social emotional issues. And he helped us work through decisions about our parenting.
I have also found that joining a parent support group for parents of gifted tweetlets has been helpful because I am able to discuss things with those parents which most of my friends and even some of the members of our extended family do not understand.
Since we decided to continue NEST Ed rather than sending the tweetlets to fly with the local flock we have found much helpful information from Gifted Homeschoolers Forum
and from the local NEST Ed group.

Intellectual Dabrowski: For more information about Parenting and Parent Groups see
http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/parenting.htm
http://giftedparentingsupport.blogspot.com.au/

Question 3: I have been told that acceleration is harmful for gifted students. What does the panel think about this?

Columbus Cheetah: I will answer that question. It is one of the myths about giftedness that acceleration is harmful for gifted students. I discuss this and other myths about giftedness on Gifted Resources website at http://www.giftedresources.org/gr/columbuscheetah.htm

Intellectual Dabrowski: For more information about Acceleration and the Iowa Acceleration Scales see http://www.accelerationinstitute.org/
http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/acceleration.htm
http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/blog_hop_acceleration.htm

Question 4 (To Paula): Paula, you are a Physicist and a Mentor for Sprite. How are you able to assist Sprite in your role as mentor?

Paula: Like Sprite I am twice exceptional. I have overcome the same learning difficulties that Sprite has and have earned tertiary degrees. I also share a love of astronomy with Sprite. So I am able to relate to her and understand her areas of interest and the struggles she has. Often I can offer advice from my own experience. Also I am a person who is not her parent or teacher so sometimes she finds it easier to confide in me.
As a 2E student Sprite sometimes needs special provisions, accommodations or concessions but is often embarrassed by the need to ask for help.
I know that Sprite finds it difficult to ask for help and I am encouraging her to ask for and accept the help she needs. I am also trying to help her overcome the negative effects of perfectionism while retaining the positive aspects of it

Intellectual Dabrowski: More information about mentors  http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/mentors.htm 

Question 5 (To all panel members): Do you have a role as an advocate to help the gifted?
Paula: Whenever you speak up to increase awareness or explain issues you are acting as an advocate. Sometimes I speak to groups such as this about the characteristics and social emotional issues associated with gifted and 2E students and my role as a mentor.

Dr Ed Needs: I advocate for gifted and 2E students by giving recommendations for the educational provisions they need. Sometimes this involves being present as an advocate for the student during parent/teacher meetings. I also speak at conferences and write articles which are widely distributed.
One of the most important ways I act as an advocate is by giving parents and guardians the information, support and encouragement they need to advocate for their children.
And I also encourage the students to advocate for themselves and request the provisions they need in a respectful manner.

Columbus Cheetah: I act as a Myth Buster and as an advocate for acceleration, appropriate education in terms of pace, level, depth and breadth and for time spent with true peers rather than age peers.

Psych-Owl-Ogist: My advocacy is very similar in form to that of my esteemed colleague Dr Ed Needs.

Retweet: I allow my story to be told in the hope that it will help others who are in the same situation as me.

Intellectual Dabrowski: For more information about advocacy read

https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2014/09/29/advocacy-just-ask-sprite-and-co/

https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/07/11/advocacy/

https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/08/10/advocacy-2/

http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/blog_hop_gifted_advocacy.htm

This is a post for the Hoagies’ Gifted Blog Hop for October 2015 How and When to Ask For Help.

To read more about this topic please visit
www.HoagiesGifted.org/blog_hop_asking_for_help.htm

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Gifted relationships

Image Jo Freitag

Image Jo Freitag

Retweet the Twitter Bird was back from the Hoagiesgifted’ July blog hop feeling very encouraged and bubbling over with ideas for future projects for her tweetlets.

She had been encouraged by Paula Prober’s post   If I’m so smart, why am I so lonely? at Your rainforest mind that there were other like minds to be found

And she had found tips about where to find like minds at Cait’s My little poppies post Finding and forging gifted relationships

She heard about the effort required maintain relationships at Adventures of Hahn Academy’s post Relationships require work /

And she had seen the value of relationships in Celi’s Crushing tall poppies post
Gifted relationships The silver lining in the gifted storm

She had found these helpful tips about building healthy friendships at Up Parenting Creek
7 Tips to help your kids build healthy friendships
Build Negotiation Skills
Foster Empathy
Teach How to Say, “I’m Sorry” (and Mean It!)
Role Play Through Tricky Situations
Encourage Hobbies (Find a Tribe)
Make Your Home Welcoming
Model Healthy Friendships

She had decided that she would incorporate these tips into their NEST Ed and also would investigate the Virtues program mentioned in GiftEd connections post
Gifted and Struggling with Relationships? The Virtues are a Good Place to Start

But it was the post from Braver than you believe which really made Retweet think!
Five relationships every gifted kid needs
http://www.braverthanyoubelieve.com/2015/07/01/leaving-on-a-jet-plain-um-plane-2/

She agreed that it is important to have people in our lives who have the relationship of role model, mentor, peer, apprentice and sergeant.

Her tweetlets had found true peers of all ages at the Bower Holiday Programs and the Psych-Owl-Ogist had arranged a mentor for them. She was not sure whether they had anyone filling the other roles.

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She asked Sprite whether she had people who fitted those descriptions.

“My mentor Paula the Physicist is also my role model” Sprite told her “She has overcome the same problems I have and has earned tertiary degrees. And she loves astronomy like I do so we always have plenty to discuss”

Image Jo Freitag

Image Jo Freitag

“The role of Sergeant is being filled by Intellectual Dabrowski and P’est Pour Parfait, the Perfectionist Poodle. I don’t need anyone else telling me what to do and how to do it!”

“I guess I do have an Apprentice” Sprite continued. “There is a little kid in a lower class who follows me round and copies what I do. Like when I got my new pinafore she wore a pinafore just like it two days later.
I do not know what her name is. I call her Pincher because she always wants to have a go on my crutches and if I sit down to eat lunch she will try to borrow them. Sometimes I let her use them and one time I took a photo of her. Then I noticed she has a bandage on her ankle so maybe she is like me and I should try to help her like Paula helps me.”

“There was a post on the hop about gifted/special needs relationships” Retweet said.
The Fissure – The Power of Special Connections: Gifted/Special Needs Friendships

Image Jo Freitag

Image Jo Freitag

“What about peers? Do you have any special friends?” asked Retweet
“Can I count Paula and Columbus Cheetah and the Memory Elephant and the Dabrowski Dogs?” asked Sprite.

This is a follow up post to the Hoagiesgifted’ July blog hop http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/blog_hop_gifted_relationships.htm 

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