INKtober

Image Jo freitag

 Every October, artists all over the world take on the InkTober drawing challenge by doing one ink drawing a day the entire month. Jake Parker created InkTober in 2009 as a challenge to improve his inking skills and develop positive drawing habits. It has since grown into a worldwide endeavour with thousands of artists taking on the challenge every year. Read all about the rules of InkTober and the materials to use at the website http://mrjakeparker.com/inktober

Last year I took the InkTober challenge and joined in with INKed, a group of ink artists on Facebook where I have a folder of my ink drawings. We had a list of suggested topics which we could use if we wished. I used the daily prompts but also used the month to make ink portraits of the characters on Sprite’s Site blog https://spritessite.wordpress.com/

This is the picture of the Sprite’s Site community which resulted from Inktober 2014

Image Jo Freitag

Image Jo Freitag

The topics suggested by the INKed group for this year, which I decided I would use, were:
There are no themes for INKtober but if you are stuck and can’t think of anything to draw, please feel free to use these prompts to help you with ideas.

  1. Zodiac
    2.Birds
    3.City
    4.Hare/hair/hairy
    5.Ship
    6.Moon
    7.Sea Creatures
    8.Collection
    9.Exaggerated perspective
    10.Something from space
    11.Balloons
    12.Elephant
    13.Shoes
    14.Lions, Tigers and Bears
    15.House
    16.Pirate
    17.Family Portrait
    18.Movie/Book Title
    19.Mythical Creatures
    20.Happiness
    21.Clocks
    22.Fence
    23.Cemetery
    24.Weather
    25.Butcher
    26.Bugs
    27.Green
    28.Carriage
    29.M
    30.Camera
    31.Halloween

Day 17 Theme was Family Portrait.

This is the picture of the Sprite’s Site community which resulted

Image Jo Freitag

Image Jo Freitag

Other pictures inked this year which will be useful for illustrating Sprite’s Site blog are

Day 13 Shoes

Image Jo Freitag

Image Jo Freitag

Day 15 House

Image Jo Freitag

Image Jo Freitag

Sprite was quite offended to see that I had used a picture from 1 June 2015  of her to illustrate Exaggerated perspective on Day 9

Image Jo Freitag

Image Jo Freitag

But the Twitter Birds were pleased to see Twitter Bird pictures on Days 18 22 and 30

This is the composite picture made up from all the pictures for each day of INKtober this year.

Image Jo Freitag

Image Jo Freitag

Hat Tips

novemberhats02
I had been very busy all October participating in INKtober and had only visited Sprite’s Site a couple of times during the month. When I returned today I found everyone absorbed in trying on hats.

The Twitter Birds were dressing up for the Spring Racing Carnival with the Melbourne Cup which is held on the first Tuesday of November.

The Dabrowski Dogs realised that we would not be doing anything lavish to celebrate Halloween but insisted that they should dress up as they do each year even if only to put on a hat.

Psycho Motor brought out the pumpkin helmet and cape he wore last year.

Imaginational made a tin foil hat to be a match with his little friend Thinks He’s an Alien Black Dog who he always thinks about at this time of year

Sensual was given a green hat but did not think it would be very comfortable to wear.

Emotional was enthusiastic about the dramatic feathers on her glamorous blue bonnet.

And Intellectual felt he must undertake a Master class in Millinery in order to be fully informed about how to create a suitable hat for the occasion.

Image Jo Freitag

Image Jo Freitag

 

 

Discovering the depth and breadth of giftedness

Image Jo Freitag

Image Jo Freitag

The sign announcing the Gifted Homeschoolers Forum October blog hop: Discovering the depth and breadth of giftedness appeared at Sprite’s Site at much the same time as the Lobsters arrived for their Annual Lobby Lobsterfest with the Lolly Lobbing competition and dancing of the Lobster Quadrille.

The suggestions for the topics which could be discussed read

This hop is about exploring the breadth and depth of giftedness – in general, in your kids, or in whatever you want to explore. Perhaps it’s also an opportunity to discuss what the public doesn’t understand – how giftedness looks like a lot of things because it IS a lot of things, not just a kid sitting in the front row of the classroom getting easy As. Perhaps less simplification of giftedness would help others to understand nuances and complexity – why we keep going on about it, and why a one size fits all GATE program doesn’t work for all gifted kids (nor even identify them all).

“Depth and breadth suggests the necessity to measure” declared the Lobsters.
The Forensic Lobsters had brought all the tools necessary to gauge the possible presence of the Wicked Lemon Wedges
They produced rulers to measure the extent of the giftedness and a protractor to measure the degree of the giftedness.
With the help of One Twitter Bird on a ladder they measured Sprite while she was standing. Even though Sprite was not standing up straight the ruler was not long enough to give an accurate measure.

measuring03a

Image Jo Freitag

So then they measured her in a seated position and checked the number of degrees of the angle of elevation of her leg and added the total (in degrees) to the height total (in centimetres) to compensate for Sprite being a 2E student and came up with an IQ of …….

“What on earth dooo yooou think yooou are doooing?” hooted the Psych-Owl- Ogist.

“To identify giftedness and derive an accurate score for IQ it is necessary for a qualified psychologist or education consultant (preferably with an interest and expertise in giftedness) to administer appropriate testing. The tests must have a sufficiently high ceiling level to be accurate at the upper level; otherwise you will only be able to say that the IQ is above a certain level. I have heard it likened to measuring all the members of the Harlem Globe Trotters basketball team with a six foot ruler and then saying they are all more than six feet tall.
And there are also other ways of identifying giftedness by observation and check lists.

But, as I told Retweet Gifted is not a homogenous group!
There are varying levels of giftedness and varying domains of expertise combined with varying character profiles and personality types.
I discuss some of the aspects of giftedness here https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/05/07/the-psych-owl-ogist-2/

And I talk about social/emotional issues here https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/05/17/the-psych-owl-ogist-4/

Fortunately Gifted Homeschoolers Forum has an excellent collection of articles about these topics at http://giftedhomeschoolers.org/resources/parent-and-professional-resources/articles/
Defining giftedness at http://giftedhomeschoolers.org/resources/parent-and-professional-resources/articles/defining-giftedness/
Tests and testing http://giftedhomeschoolers.org/resources/parent-and-professional-resources/articles/testing-2/

“The other problem” chimed in Columbus Cheetah “is that very often people have mistaken ideas about what giftedness is and is not. There are so many myths surrounding giftedness. I always aim to counter the myths in my role as Myth Buster
http://www.giftedresources.org/gr/columbuscheetah.htm
And I also advocate for employing acceleration when appropriate and using the Iowa acceleration scales
https://www.accelerationinstitute.org/Resources/IAS.aspx

One of the common misconceptions is that all children are gifted
Gifted Homeschoolers Forum has a page of Rapid Responses to this issue at http://giftedhomeschoolers.org/resources/parent-and-professional-resources/articles/are-all-children-gifted/

Thank goodness Gifted Homeschoolers Forum gives links to information about giftedness and its measurement so that we do not have to do not have to rely on Lobsters with rulers and protractors.

This is a post for Gifted Homeschoolers Forum October blog hop.
To find all the posts please go to

http://giftedhomeschoolers.org/blog-hops/discovering-the-depth-and-breadth-of-giftedness/

bloghop191015

Asking for Help – A Guest Expert Panel Q&A session

Image Jo Freitag

Image Jo Freitag

The Hoagies’ Gifted Blog Hop for October 2015 looks at How and When to Ask For Help
www.HoagiesGifted.org/blog_hop_asking_for_help.htm

Who can help gifted and 2E students and how and when should we seek help?
From school administrators, teachers and coaches, mentors and leaders? From counsellors or therapists? From state &/or federal government? From humankind? From the Universe? From family and friends and other members of the gifted community? Who helps or has helped you and how? How did you seek them or reach them or find them? What difference did it make?

To address these questions we have assembled a panel of experts from Sprite’s Site.
Paula, the Physicist, will answer questions about the role of a mentor.
Dr. Ed Needs, the Education Consultant, will be joining the session via Skype.
Columbus Cheetah will speak about the myths surrounding gifted and 2E students.
The Psych-Owl-Ogist will address issues relating to identification and testing and social/emotional issues.
Twitter Bird Retweet, mother of gifted tweetlets, will speak about the support available from Parent Support Groups.
A representative from the government was invited but sent a note of apology and referred the audience to their website.
Intellectual Dabrowski was not one of the invited experts but offered to share his extensive knowledge.

The format will be Question and Answer to preselected questions.
At the end of the session the audience will have an opportunity to ask their questions in the Comments section at the end of this post.

Question 1: How can you identify gifted students and where can you go for testing?
Psych-Owl-Ogist: There are checklists which can be completed by teachers and parents and various other ways of recording observations which can help to identify gifted students.
However if you need an I.Q. test administered you need to find a psychologist or education consultant who is qualified and registered to administer the test. And it is important to choose a person who specialises in working with gifted people.
The main tests are the Stanford Binet and the WISC. For articles and discussions about the comparisons between these and other tests see http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/identification.htm 
http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/testing.htm

Dr Ed Needs: Some education consultants are also qualified and registered to administer these tests as well as academic achievement level testing. They can also give testing to show areas of strength/weakness and detect possible learning difficulties and give the necessary recommendations, therapy and support.

Intellectual Dabrowski: If you are looking for psychologists and education consultants in Australia who have a special interest in giftedness see Gifted Resources list at http://www.giftedresources.org/gr/psychedcons.htm

Question 2 (To Retweet): Where have you found helpful advice for raising your gifted tweetlets?

Retweet: The Psych-Owl-Ogist tested the tweetlets and gave us helpful advice about social emotional issues. And he helped us work through decisions about our parenting.
I have also found that joining a parent support group for parents of gifted tweetlets has been helpful because I am able to discuss things with those parents which most of my friends and even some of the members of our extended family do not understand.
Since we decided to continue NEST Ed rather than sending the tweetlets to fly with the local flock we have found much helpful information from Gifted Homeschoolers Forum
and from the local NEST Ed group.

Intellectual Dabrowski: For more information about Parenting and Parent Groups see
http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/parenting.htm
http://giftedparentingsupport.blogspot.com.au/

Question 3: I have been told that acceleration is harmful for gifted students. What does the panel think about this?

Columbus Cheetah: I will answer that question. It is one of the myths about giftedness that acceleration is harmful for gifted students. I discuss this and other myths about giftedness on Gifted Resources website at http://www.giftedresources.org/gr/columbuscheetah.htm

Intellectual Dabrowski: For more information about Acceleration and the Iowa Acceleration Scales see http://www.accelerationinstitute.org/
http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/acceleration.htm
http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/blog_hop_acceleration.htm

Question 4 (To Paula): Paula, you are a Physicist and a Mentor for Sprite. How are you able to assist Sprite in your role as mentor?

Paula: Like Sprite I am twice exceptional. I have overcome the same learning difficulties that Sprite has and have earned tertiary degrees. I also share a love of astronomy with Sprite. So I am able to relate to her and understand her areas of interest and the struggles she has. Often I can offer advice from my own experience. Also I am a person who is not her parent or teacher so sometimes she finds it easier to confide in me.
As a 2E student Sprite sometimes needs special provisions, accommodations or concessions but is often embarrassed by the need to ask for help.
I know that Sprite finds it difficult to ask for help and I am encouraging her to ask for and accept the help she needs. I am also trying to help her overcome the negative effects of perfectionism while retaining the positive aspects of it

Intellectual Dabrowski: More information about mentors  http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/mentors.htm 

Question 5 (To all panel members): Do you have a role as an advocate to help the gifted?
Paula: Whenever you speak up to increase awareness or explain issues you are acting as an advocate. Sometimes I speak to groups such as this about the characteristics and social emotional issues associated with gifted and 2E students and my role as a mentor.

Dr Ed Needs: I advocate for gifted and 2E students by giving recommendations for the educational provisions they need. Sometimes this involves being present as an advocate for the student during parent/teacher meetings. I also speak at conferences and write articles which are widely distributed.
One of the most important ways I act as an advocate is by giving parents and guardians the information, support and encouragement they need to advocate for their children.
And I also encourage the students to advocate for themselves and request the provisions they need in a respectful manner.

Columbus Cheetah: I act as a Myth Buster and as an advocate for acceleration, appropriate education in terms of pace, level, depth and breadth and for time spent with true peers rather than age peers.

Psych-Owl-Ogist: My advocacy is very similar in form to that of my esteemed colleague Dr Ed Needs.

Retweet: I allow my story to be told in the hope that it will help others who are in the same situation as me.

Intellectual Dabrowski: For more information about advocacy read

https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2014/09/29/advocacy-just-ask-sprite-and-co/

https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/07/11/advocacy/

https://spritessite.wordpress.com/2012/08/10/advocacy-2/

http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/blog_hop_gifted_advocacy.htm

This is a post for the Hoagies’ Gifted Blog Hop for October 2015 How and When to Ask For Help.

To read more about this topic please visit
www.HoagiesGifted.org/blog_hop_asking_for_help.htm

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